The Confederate States - Bond Signed March 1, 1864 - Co-signer: E. Apperson

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Product Description

CONFEDERATE STATES BOND.

Partly Printed Bond signed: "E. Apperson for" Register of the Treasury, 1p, 15½x8½. Richmond, 1864 March 1. In part: "On the First day of July, 1894, The Confederate States of America will pay to the Bearer of this Bond at the Seat of Government or at such place of deposit as may be appointed by the Secretary of the Treasury the Sum of ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS with interest thereon from this date at the rate of Six Per Cent per annum payable semi-annually on the first days of January and July in each year...that the principal and interest whereof shall be free from taxation and for the payment of the Interest thereon the entire net receipts of any Export Duty hereafter laid on the value of all Cotton, Tobacco and Naval Stores which shall be exported from the Confederate States...are hereby specially pledged...." Bond No. 582, Fourth Series. This bond, issued after an Act of Congress passed by the Confederacy on February 17, 1864, was used to raise monies for desperately needed supplies and food for the beleaguered Confederate troops. The George Washington equestrian statue was depicted as Washington was considered a "founding father" of America, giving credibility to the Southern cause. Confederate bonds, backed by cotton exports, were bought primarily by European investors who were supporting the South during the Civil War (1861-1865). Four-fifths of the cotton for the flourishing textile mills of Great Britain and Western Europe came from the Confederacy. The Union's blockade of Confederate seaports (1864) made it impossible for the South to get cotton to Europe and led to default on bonds and other loans. Lightly creased with folds. Slightly soiled at blank margins, minor stains at upper left blank edge. Overall, fine condition. Framed in the Gallery of History style: 23¾x22¾.

Sold by: HistoryForSale. DOCUMENT 102673

Manufacturer Description

CONFEDERATE STATES BOND. Partly Printed Bond signed: "E. Apperson for" Register of the Treasury, 1p, 15½x8½. Richmond, 1864 March 1. In part: "On the First day of July, 1894, The Confederate States of America will pay to the Bearer of this Bond at the Seat of Government or at such place of deposit as may be appointed by the Secretary of the Treasury the Sum of ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS with interest thereon from this date at the rate of Six Per Cent per annum payable semi-annually on the first days of January and July in each year...that the principal and interest whereof shall be free from taxation and for the payment of the Interest thereon the entire net receipts of any Export Duty hereafter laid on the value of all Cotton, Tobacco and Naval Stores which shall be exported from the Confederate States...are hereby specially pledged...." Bond No. 582, Fourth Series. This bond, issued after an Act of Congress passed by the Confederacy on February 17, 1864, was used to raise monies for desperately needed supplies and food for the beleaguered Confederate troops. The George Washington equestrian statue was depicted as Washington was considered a "founding father" of America, giving credibility to the Southern cause. Confederate bonds, backed by cotton exports, were bought primarily by European investors who were supporting the South during the Civil War (1861-1865). Four-fifths of the cotton for the flourishing textile mills of Great Britain and Western Europe came from the Confederacy. The Union's blockade of Confederate seaports (1864) made it impossible for the South to get cotton to Europe and led to default on bonds and other loans. Lightly creased with folds. Slightly soiled at blank margins, minor stains at upper left blank edge. Overall, fine condition. Framed in the Gallery of History style: 23¾x22¾. - Please contact us if you have any questions or require additional information. DOCUMENT 102673

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