Alexander Hamilton - Printed Document - Signed In Ink - August 31, 1792

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ALEXANDER HAMILTON

Important printed circular signed in ink (1792), standardizing reporting procedures for revenue collectors, double matted with a picture of Hamilton to 19x13½.

Printed Document signed in ink: "A. Hamilton", 1 page, 6½x8. Treasury Department, 1792 August 31. Marked "Circular" and addressed to "Sir."

In full: "Agreeably to an order of the Senate of the United States, passed on the 7th of May last, a copy of which is herewith transmitted, I have to request that you will furnish me, immediately after the first of October next with the particular statements required by the said order. From these a general Abstract is to be formed at the Treasury; and as Uniformity in the mode of stating the receipts and disbursements will facilitate the business, a form is hereto annexed as a guide. [Form not included.] It is my desire that the Collectors will obtain and transmit at the same time similar documents from the Inspectors, Gaugers, Measurers and Weighers, or other persons holding under the Collectors any office or employment from which salaries, fees or emoluments are derived. I am with consideration, Sir your obedient servant". Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804), an aide (and sometime field commander) for George Washington during the Revolutionary War, was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New York (1782, 1783 and 1788), a delegate to the U.S. Constitution Convention (1787) and served as George Washington's Secretary of the Treasury from 1789-1795. Although - as the most outspoken advocate of a strong central government and chief executive - Hamilton's influence at the Constitutional Conventional was slight, he emerged as one of the most persuasive advocates for ratification, writing 51 of the 85 letters in support of the Constitution later known as The Federalist Papers. (James Madison wrote 29 of the pieces, John Jay five.) Some consider...

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ALEXANDER HAMILTON Important printed circular signed in ink (1792), standardizing reporting procedures for revenue collectors, double matted with a picture of Hamilton to 19x13½. Printed Document signed in ink: "A. Hamilton", 1 page, 6½x8. Treasury Department, 1792 August 31. Marked "Circular" and addressed to "Sir." In Full: "Agreeably to an order of the Senate of the United States, passed on the 7th of May last, a copy of which is herewith transmitted, I have to request that you will furnish me, immediately after the first of October next with the particular statements required by the said order. From these a general Abstract is to be formed at the Treasury; and as Uniformity in the mode of stating the receipts and disbursements will facilitate the business, a form is hereto annexed as a guide. [Form not included.] It is my desire that the Collectors will obtain and transmit at the same time similar documents from the Inspectors, Gaugers, Measurers and Weighers, or other persons holding under the Collectors any office or employment from which salaries, fees or emoluments are derived. I am with consideration, Sir your obedient servant". Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804), an aide (and sometime field commander) for George Washington during the American Revolutionary War, was a delegate to the Continental Congress from New York (1782, 1783 and 1788), a delegate to the U.S. Constitution Convention (1787), and served as President George Washington's Secretary of the Treasury from 1789-1795. Although - as the most outspoken advocate of a strong central government and chief executive - Hamilton's influence at the Constitutional Conventional was slight, he emerged as one of the most persuasive advocates for ratification, writing 51 of the 85 letters in support of the Constitution later known as The Federalist Papers. (James Madison wrote 29 of the pieces, John Jay f... - Please contact us if you have any questions or require additional information. DOCUMENT 285342

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